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Contexts

Contexts our Schools Operate Within:

Hertfordshire remains a county of contrasts – between rich and poor, rural and urban, tradition and innovation. Some of the county's strengths can also be the source of weaknesses and vice versa. For example, the general affluence of the county can exacerbate the problems of those who are struggling to make ends meet, but it is in some of the most disadvantaged areas where you will find some of the strongest communities. 

Hertfordshire Indices of Deprivation

Pre-Covid-19 Hertfordshire Context

The population of Hertfordshire currently stands at 1,154,800 and is increasing due to higher life expectancy, a rising birth rate, and inward migration. In particular, Hertfordshire’s population of over 65s is expected to increase by 22% between 2011 and 2021 and this will have a significant impact on the demand for services. Hertfordshire’s minority ethnic population is growing with almost 20% of the county’s population belonging to an ethnic group other than White British.

Hertfordshire is often viewed as a prosperous county, yet there are significant areas of deprivation caused by a multiplicity of factors. Borehamwood Cowley Hill in Hertsmere and Northwick in Three Rivers districts are in the 10% most deprived areas in England. Waltham Cross, Flamstead End and Adeyfield East are the three worst income deprived areas in Hertfordshire affecting children.

Borehamwood Cowley Hill, Waltham Cross, and Cheshunt South & Theobalds are the three worst income deprived areas in Hertfordshire affecting older people. Despite the recession the number of dwellings in Hertfordshire is increasing. The number of households in Hertfordshire is also projected to increase with many more people living in single occupancy households. The Hertfordshire areas with the highest deprivation relating to barriers to housing and services are Ashridge, Watling, and Hatfield East.

Hertfordshire house prices continue to increase and housing affordability and homelessness are concerns county wide. Reporting of crime is increasing with the most reported crimes in Hertfordshire (according to the IMD crime and disorder domain) being in Central ward in Watford, Hatfield West and Bedwell in Stevenage. Recording of domestic abuse has also increased and Hertfordshire Constabulary have initiatives aimed at domestic abuse and hate crimes. The Hertfordshire electorate has mixed engagement, with voter turnout for the 2015 General Election being highest in St Albans at 74% and lowest in Broxbourne at 61%. There is a highly engaged voluntary sector in Hertfordshire with 3441 registered charities in January 2016. In 2012 the value of volunteer time was estimated as £423m.

Hertfordshire’s growing workforce is highly skilled, and GCSE attainment remains high. However, the areas with the lowest attainment and skills in the Hertfordshire population are Northwick, Adeyfield East, Waltham Cross, and Highfield & St Pauls. An estimated 3.7% of 16-18 year olds known to Hertfordshire County Council are Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET). The areas of Hertfordshire with the highest levels of employment deprivation are Borehamwood Cowley Hill, Northwick in Three Rivers and Bedwell in Stevenage. Life expectancy at birth for Hertfordshire residents has been increasing. However, some Hertfordshire communities face significant challenges with health deprivation and disability and the Index of Multiple Deprivation shows these are Bandley Hill in Stevenage, Borehamwood Cowley Hill, and Vicarage in Watford. In the 2011 census 14.3% of the Hertfordshire population said they had a long term health problem or disability and 3.9% reported bad or very bad health. Public health concerns include higher risk drinking and obesity. Rates of hospital admissions for alcohol related harm have been rising, and 61% of adults are overweight or obese.

Deaths from dementia and Alzheimer’s are increasing and there has also been an increase in hospitals stays as a result of intentional self-harm. Fuel poverty in Hertfordshire is decreasing but long term climate change is expected to have an impact on agriculture, business, commuting and day to day life in the county. Hertfordshire local authorities have made significant improvements on recycling, and across the county only 25% of waste is being sent to landfill, which is above the Eastern region average. The Hertfordshire Local Economic Partnership’s Economic Outlook estimated the output of Hertfordshire’s economy at £26.7 billion in 2011. Hertfordshire has the highest employment participation rates of all LEP areas and economic activity rates are high. However, jobs growth has been weak in recent years. Around 11% of Hertfordshire residents are self-employed, above the national average of 9.7%

Hertfordshire residents are relatively well paid, whether they work in the county or commute into London or neighbouring counties. However, as noted previously, Hertfordshire housing prices continue to grow. The higher cost of housing in London and surrounding areas is likely to produce a ripple effect driving up wages and housing costs in commuting districts. The East of England Forecasting Model (EEFM) estimates that the recession was slightly less severe in the Hertfordshire area than across the UK.

However, there is a danger that the long term economic growth rate could slow with Hertfordshire lagging behind other LEP areas and the national average. 

The Collett School:

Type: Foundation Special School

Site: School Owned through Foundation

Designation: Special School for children with complex learning disabilities including ASD, MLD, SLCN 

St Luke's School:

Type: Foundation Special School

Site: School Owned through Foundation

Designation: Special School for children with complex learning disabilities including ASD, MLD, SLCN 

Forest House Education Centre:

Type: Department of St Luke's Foundation Special School

Site: Rented from NHS

Designation: Tier 4 Mental Health Hospital School

June 2020

Collett

 

St Luke's

 

FHEC

 

Total

Staffing

f/t p/t f/t p/t f/t p/t FTE
QTS School Leaders (non-class based) 1 0.4 1 0.4 1 0.2 4
QTS Teacher Leaders (non-class based) 1 0 1 0 0 0 2
QTS Teacher Leaders (class based) 4 0 4 0 0 0 8
QTS Teachers 9 0.3 13 1 3 0 26.3
               
UQT Teacher Leaders (non-class based) 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
UQT Teacher Leaders (class based) 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
UQT Teachers (class based) 1 0 3 0 0 0 4
               
HLTA (High Level Teaching Assistants) 3 0 0 0 0 0.6 3.6
Teaching Assistants 22 3.2 19 1.3 0 0 45.5
Teaching Assistant Apprentices 2 0 3 0 0 0 5
               
Reception 0 0.8 0 1 1 0 2.8
Midday Supervisors 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Premises 1 0 1 0 0 0 2
Premises Apprentices 0 0.4 0 0.6 0 0 1
               
Admin Leaders 0 0.8 0 0.8 0 0.4 2
Admin 1 0.4 1 0.4 0 0.2 3
Fundraising Leaders 0 0.4 0 0.4 0 0.2 1
Fundraising 1 0 0 0.3 0 0 1.3
               
 

Collett

 

St Luke's

 

FHEC

 

Total

Pupils

f/t

p/t

f/t

p/t

f/t

p/t

 
On Roll 130 0 163 1 0 0  
Dual Roll (Subsidiary) 0 0 0 0 21 0 21
Residential Students (FHAU) - - - - 15 0 15
Day Pupils 130 0 164 0 6 0 300
Boys 89 0 98 0 6 0  
Girls 32 0 39 0 13 0  
Transgender 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

 

Pupil Premium

Collett St Luke's FHEC Federation Average
Free School Meals (Now) 23.0% (UP) 30.7% (UP) 5% (UP) 19.6%
Free School Meals (Ever-6) 36.9% (UP) 27.8% (UP) 0% (SAME) 21.6%
Services Children 0% (SAME) 0% (SAME) 0% (SAME) 0%
(Pupil Premium Children) 33.3% (UP) 39.2% (UP) 5% (UP) 25.8%
         
Adopted from Care (6) 4.68% (UP) (4) 2.4% (DOWN) (1) 4.5% (UP) 3.9%
Looked After Children (3) 2.3% (DOWN) (5) 3.0% (UP) (0) 0% (SAME) 2.5%
(Pupil Premium Plus Children) 6.98% 5.4% 4.5% 5.6%
         

Sports Premium (primary aged children)

56 (43.8%)

19 (11.5%)

0 (0%)

76

 

 

 

 

 

Year 7 CatchUp Pupils

14

26

0

40

 

 

 

 

 

English as Additional Language

8.7% (UP) 2.8% (DOWN) 8% (SAME)  
         
Percentage of Pupils from an Ethnic Minority   20.3% (UP)